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Imaginative Prayer Series: Jesus Calls the Disciples (Mark 1:16-20)

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This is the seventh contemplation in a series of imaginative prayer resources written by and recorded for The Practice community. Imaginative prayer is way of meeting with the Lord by using our imagination to enter a Gospel story. Using our imagination to experience the sights and sounds of the scene helps to bring our whole selves into the presence of Christ. The purpose of this prayer is to meet Jesus face-to-face and grow in intimacy with Him.

Our first prayer written by Father Michael brought us into the room with Mary at the annunciation, and the second contemplation was a reflection on the shepherds outside of Bethlehem written by Jason Feffer. In our third imaginative prayer Kellye Fabian helped us join the story of the Magi as they travel to worship the newborn king and the fourth was a reflection on the holy family’s escape to Egypt written by Roselyn Heims. Our fifth contemplation was written by Sam Tinken and placed us on the banks of the Jordan at the baptism of Jesus. The sixth imaginative prayer, written by Lori Shoults, led us in a reflection on the miracle during the wedding at Cana.

In this meditation written by Ashlee Eiland, we join with Simon and Andrew, James and John as Jesus calls us to follow him.

1.7.18 Discovering the Will of God

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It was so great to be back together with everyone last night and continue our journey through the second movement of Ignatius Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises. Our opening liturgy led us through a reflection on the baptism of Christ. We rested in the personal love of God, and soaked in the words of the Lord, “You are my child, the Beloved, with you I am well pleased.”

Then Ashlee helped us move away from experiencing God’s will as a formula to solve and build a foundation of connectivity, gratitude and retreat. In Jesus, we see that every part of discovering God’s will happens in the presence of the Lord. I continue to sit with something Ashlee said as we transitioned into the practice. Do I want God’s loving presence more than I want an answer to a question?

Ashlee then guided us through a practice of recognizing where we are in proximity to God, releasing our anxieties and fears in order to receive God’s thoughts, and resting in the God’s loving presence.

Have a listen to the full teaching and practice.

If you would like to continue exploring the will of God, we would recommend Surrender to Love, The Gift of Being Yourself, and Desiring God’s Will by David Benner.

Kingdom Practices
This week, will you join me and continue to engage the practice Ashlee taught? Will you recognize, release, and rest in God’s presence this week?

We are also continuing our practice of imaginative prayer. This week’s original contemplation was written by Lori Shoults, and it will lead us deeply into the first miracle Jesus performs in the Gospels.

Imaginative Prayer Series: The Wedding at Cana (John 2:1-12)

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This is the sixth contemplation in a series of imaginative prayer resources written by and recorded for The Practice community. Imaginative prayer is way of meeting with the Lord by using our imagination to enter a Gospel story. Using our imagination to experience the sights and sounds of the scene helps to bring our whole selves into the presence of Christ. The purpose of this prayer is to meet Jesus face-to-face and grow in intimacy with Him.

Our first prayer written by Father Michael brought us into the room with Mary at the annunciation, and the second contemplation was a reflection on the shepherds outside of Bethlehem written by Jason Feffer. In our third imaginative prayer Kellye Fabian helped us join the story of the Magi as they travel to worship the newborn king and the fourth was a reflection on the holy family’s escape to Egypt written by Roselyn Heims. Our fifth contemplation was written by Sam Tinken and placed us on the banks of the Jordan at the baptism of Jesus.

This imaginative prayer, written by Lori Shoults, leads us in a reflection on the miracle during the wedding at Cana.

Imaginative Prayer Series: The Baptism of Christ (Matthew 3:13-17)

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This is the fifth contemplation in a series of imaginative prayer resources written by and recorded for The Practice community. Imaginative prayer is way of meeting with the Lord by using our imagination to enter a Gospel story. Using our imagination to experience the sights and sounds of the scene helps to bring our whole selves into the presence of Christ. The purpose of this prayer is to meet Jesus face-to-face and grow in intimacy with Him.

Our first prayer written by Father Michael brought us into the room with Mary at the annunciation, and the second contemplation was a reflection on the shepherds outside of Bethlehem written by Jason Feffer. In our third imaginative prayer Kellye Fabian helped us join the story of the Magi as they travel to worship the newborn king and the fourth was a reflection on the holy family’s escape to Egypt written by Roselyn Heims.

This fifth contemplation written by Sam Tinken places us on the banks of the Jordan at the baptism of Jesus.

(artwork by Daniel Bonnell)

Imaginative Prayer Series: Escape to Egypt (Matthew 2:13-23)

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This is the fourth contemplation in a series of imaginative prayer resources written by and recorded for The Practice community. Imaginative prayer is way of meeting with the Lord by using our imagination to enter a Gospel story. Using our imagination to experience the sights and sounds of the scene helps to bring our whole selves into the presence of Christ. The purpose of this prayer is to meet Jesus face-to-face and grow in intimacy with Him.

Our first prayer written by Father Michael brought us into the room with Mary at the annunciation. The second contemplation was a reflection on the shepherds outside of Bethlehem written by Jason Feffer, and in the third imaginative prayer written by Kellye Fabian, we joined the story of the Magi as they travel to worship the newborn king.

This fourth contemplation was written by Roselyn Heims. It is a reflection on the holy family’s escape to Egypt.

 

Imaginative Prayer Series: The Visit of the Magi (Matthew 2:1-12)

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This is the third contemplation in a series of imaginative prayer resources written by and recorded for The Practice community. Our first prayer written by Father Michael brought us into the room with Mary at the annunciation. The second contemplation was a reflection on the shepherds outside of Bethlehem written by Jason Feffer. In this week’s original imaginative prayer written by Kellye Fabian, we join the story of the Magi as they travel to worship the newborn king.

Imaginative prayer is way of meeting with the Lord by using our imagination to enter a Gospel story. Using our imagination to experience the sights and sounds of the scene helps to bring our whole selves into the presence of Christ. The purpose of this prayer is to meet Jesus face-to-face and grow in intimacy with Him.

(The Mural “Adoration of the Magi” was painted by a group of Benedictine monks from Conception Abbey.)

12.10.17 The Incarnation

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Last night we continued our journey through the second movement of Ignatius Loyola’s Spiritual Exercises by contemplating the scandalous mystery of the incarnation. Our opening liturgy once again tapped into our longing in this Advent season. We await the coming peace of Christ.

Then, we marveled at the incarnation. How is it that the creator of the universe would come among us in diapers? The humility of our God is absolutely astonishing. While we want to win and be right, Jesus emptied himself. He humbled himself to the point of assuming the entire human experience, even death. Because of the incarnation, God has personal knowledge of contentment and poverty, joy and sorrow, excitement and fear, strength and weakness, and even pain.

We then asked how we are coming into Advent and brought that to Christ in a colloquy. We imagined ourselves meeting with Jesus and sharing with him the primary emotion we are bringing into this season. Our time conversing with Christ beautifully led us to the table and the mystery of Christ’s presence in the bread and juice.

Have a listen to the full teaching and practice.

Kingdom Practices
For the duration of our time in the second movement we will continue the practice of imaginative prayer. In order to engage this practice, we have written and recorded ten original contemplations. Each one was written by a member of our community, and they will help us to enter a Gospel story and meet personally with Jesus.

Every Monday our email will include a link to the week’s prayer. This week, we begin with an original contemplation written by Jason Feffer. This contemplation centers on the birth of Christ, and the shepherds who first heard the good news. Please make some time this week to engage this practice.

Imaginative Prayer Series: The Birth of Christ (Luke 2:1-21)

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This is the second contemplation in a series of imaginative prayer resources written by and recorded for The Practice community. Imaginative prayer is way of meeting with the Lord by using our imagination to enter a Gospel story. Using our imagination to experience the sights and sounds of the scene helps to bring our whole selves into the presence of Christ. The purpose of this prayer is to meet Jesus face-to-face and grow in intimacy with Him.

Our first prayer written by Father Michael brought us into the room with Mary at the annunciation. This contemplation is a reflection on the birth of Christ as experienced by the shepherds outside of Bethlehem written by Jason Feffer.

(painting by James Jacques Joseph Tissot)

12.3.17 The Call of the King

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The second movement of the Spiritual Exercises is a reflection on the life and ministry of Jesus, and we began our reflection on the life of Christ last night by celebrating the first Sunday of Advent. The opening liturgy drew out the longing within each of us for the coming of Christ.

Then Father Michael wove the themes of Advent into the second movement of the Exercises. The journey of Advent, Father Michael said, is one of “coming to a fuller awareness of Christ breaking into the world, breaking into our lives.” He shared five ways we can prepare to receive the presence of Jesus before leading us in an Ignatian contemplation from the second movement of the Exercises, The Call of Christ the King.

Have a listen to the full teaching and practice.

Kingdom Practices
For the duration of our time in the second movement we want to practice the spiritual discipline of imaginative prayer. In order to help our community engage this practice, we have written and recorded ten original contemplations. Each one was written by a member of our community, and these contemplations will help us enter a Gospel story and meet personally with Jesus.

Every Monday our email will include a link to a new prayer. This week, we begin with an original contemplation written by Father Michael. This contemplation centers on the Annunciation, Mary’s beautiful response to God’s invitation. Please make some time this week to engage our practice.

Imaginative Prayer Series: The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38)

By | Advent, Imaginative Prayers | No Comments

This is the first contemplation in a series of imaginative prayer resources written by and recorded for The Practice community. Imaginative prayer is way of meeting with the Lord by using our imagination to enter a Gospel story. Using our imagination to experience the sights and sounds of the scene helps to bring our whole selves into the presence of Christ. The purpose of this prayer is to meet Jesus face-to-face and grow in intimacy with Him.

This original contemplation written by Father Michael centers on the Annunciation, Mary’s beautiful response to God’s invitation.

(artwork by Patricia Brintle www.patriciabrintle.com)